Author Topic: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)  (Read 13762 times)

Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2018, 03:34:31 pm »
what about "have" & "take"

eg I would probably use.

"I'm going to have a bath" or "I'm going to have a nap"

I believe the Americans are more likely  to use

"I'm going to take a bath" or "I'm going to take a nap"

That said I'm more likely to say "I'm going to take a dump" then "I'm going to have a dump"

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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2018, 03:40:50 pm »
trousers v pants is a good one as well.


Which then gets confusing as Mancs (ie people originally from Manchester) tend to use pants when they mean trousers.


For the rest of us pants are (generally) mens underwear, ie your Y fronts or your shreddies (not to be confused with the breakfast cereal)

I say generally as you can have cycling or jogging pants ie lycra leggings, which aren't underwear (although they have been known to have the knickers(womens underwear)  showing through them ;)
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2018, 03:42:59 pm »
on a roll here lol


I think I'm right in saying that your side of the nd you don't generally have the concept of a fortnight?
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2018, 03:45:26 pm »
torch or flashlight?
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Offline Conniesaki

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2018, 03:48:13 pm »
Possible alternative for both sides of the pond: "I'm going to dump, bathe and then nap."

Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2018, 04:10:03 pm »
Possible alternative for both sides of the pond: "I'm going to dump, bathe and then nap."

or if you're getting ready to go out

"**** , shave & shower"
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2018, 04:10:52 pm »
and of course your latest President is hilarious as "trump" over here means to fart  ;D
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Offline maxtog

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2018, 04:30:32 pm »
I believe the best system is the one the Chinese (and perhaps others) use, which is YYYY/MM/DD/Hour/Minute/Second/second decimals. This system cannot be confused and can be lengthened and shortened with no modification needed. One can specify the year or the microsecond of an event with one unchanged system.

Bingo.  And it can be sorted correctly and easily.  It is called ISO 8601, normally just called "ISO dates"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601

YYYY/MM/DD/etc is the only logical way to write and store dates (and dates with times).  So PLEASE let me know when you have changed everyone to use it.  I find it amusing that only China and Japan use it [exclusively].  Meanwhile, I have to keep using the stupid MM/DD/YYYY so people know what the hell I am saying.  Although I have dated things the right way (ISO) and it does seem that many people understand it, as long as the day is > 12.  2018-01-02 is ambiguous (especially to DD-MM-YYYY countries), but 2018-02-27 is not.

BTW- I think DD/MM/YYYY is just as stupid, maybe even more so than MM/DD/YYYY.
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Offline maxtog

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2018, 04:31:45 pm »
is that liberals or Liberals ?

Or libourals?  :)
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2018, 04:39:31 pm »
Bingo.  And it can be sorted correctly and easily.  It is called ISO 8601, normally just called "ISO dates"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601

YYYY/MM/DD/etc is the only logical way to write and store dates (and dates with times).  So PLEASE let me know when you have changed everyone to use it.  I find it amusing that only China and Japan use it [exclusively].  Meanwhile, I have to keep using the stupid MM/DD/YYYY so people know what the hell I am saying.  Although I have dated things the right way (ISO) and it does seem that many people understand it, as long as the day is > 12.  2018-01-02 is ambiguous (especially to DD-MM-YYYY countries), but 2018-02-27 is not.

BTW- I think DD/MM/YYYY is just as stupid, maybe even more so than MM/DD/YYYY.


This is an interesting read

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/10/americans-write-dates-differently-practically-everyone-else-relates-data-storage-holy-wars-soft-boiled-eggs/


Extract:
Quote
Although we find it normal, our month-first arrangement to the rest of the world makes little sense, being what one commentator has called middle-endian (computer speak for bass-ackwards).

Endian refers to the organization of binary data storage whereby the most significant byte (8-bit unit of data) is typically stored first (in the smallest address, on the left) or last (in the largest address, on the right). If stored first, it is referred to as “big endian” and last, it is called little-endian.

When it comes to bytes of numbers, the first (left) digit is usually the most significant and will have the greatest value (e.g., if you had a numeric number 1,234, the “1” represents 1000 – by far the largest value in the number). This is the same with dates, where the year, which represents 12 months and 365 days, has the greatest “value,” and the day, the lowest.

In putting dates into bytes, in the big-endian format it would be written as YYYY/MM/DD, while in the little-endian format, it would read DD/MM/YYYY. By putting the month first, we’ve screwed this orderly system up by putting the middle value on an end (middle-endian) – and annoyed a large portion of the planet in the process.
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Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2018, 04:43:25 pm »
Actually, now that you mention it, either one works here. I think I would tend toward 'take' but using 'have' would not raise any eyebrows.

TMI referring to the last reference.  ;)

Brian

what about "have" & "take"

eg I would probably use.

"I'm going to have a bath" or "I'm going to have a nap"

I believe the Americans are more likely  to use

"I'm going to take a bath" or "I'm going to take a nap"

That said I'm more likely to say "I'm going to take a dump" then "I'm going to have a dump"
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Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2018, 04:49:01 pm »
The YYYY/MM/DD thing is understandable to me but only if used in that fashion; the first time I ran into it, the year was shortened to two numbers as in YY/MM/DD and I was a while figuring out what the hell was going on. Neither the American nor the western European methods seemed to work correctly.

On a slightly different note, 7:00 o'clock only happens one per day in Germany too and our AM/PM system confuses them as well as our date notation. Then again, their clocks confuse me as well.

Brian

Bingo.  And it can be sorted correctly and easily.  It is called ISO 8601, normally just called "ISO dates"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601

YYYY/MM/DD/etc is the only logical way to write and store dates (and dates with times).  So PLEASE let me know when you have changed everyone to use it.  I find it amusing that only China and Japan use it [exclusively].  Meanwhile, I have to keep using the stupid MM/DD/YYYY so people know what the hell I am saying.  Although I have dated things the right way (ISO) and it does seem that many people understand it, as long as the day is > 12.  2018-01-02 is ambiguous (especially to DD-MM-YYYY countries), but 2018-02-27 is not.

BTW- I think DD/MM/YYYY is just as stupid, maybe even more so than MM/DD/YYYY.
Homo Sapiens Sapiens and just a tad of Neanderthal but it usually does not show....  My Private mail is blocked; it is not you, it is me, just like that dating partner said all those years ago. Please send an e-mail if you want to contact me privately.

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Offline maxtog

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2018, 04:52:23 pm »
I think it is bizarre that Brits have such a huge aversion to the letter "Z" (that is Zeeeee, not Zed!!!) while holding on to all those extra "u"'s.  I mean, "-ize" is one of the most purposeful use of Z, and without it, there isn't much left, well maybe "-zation"

categorize your colors
normalize your flavorings
sexualize that humor
industrialize your armor production
compartmentalize that behavior

Of course, English is a pretty insane language, anyway.  At least it is very descriptive, rich, and colorful.
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Offline VirginiaJim

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2018, 08:12:06 pm »
I pronounce 'been' as 'bean'.  Gave my friends in high school (US) lots of mirth.  I pronounce 'herb' as 'herb' not 'erb'.  Words I picked up early as a kid in England.
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Offline Conniesaki

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #29 on: February 28, 2018, 08:32:59 pm »
Gave my friends in high school (US) lots of mirth.

... when they really wanted frankincense ... OK, gold.