Author Topic: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)  (Read 11789 times)

Offline Rick Hall

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #30 on: March 01, 2018, 02:29:58 am »
Bangers and Mash.
Perfectly understandable.

Oh, and "take the jug handle" in NJ, which is also crystal clear to this bloke from CO.

Rotary, traffic circle, roundabout, .... dafuk.

Rick
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #31 on: March 01, 2018, 02:34:29 am »
Bangers and Mash.
Perfectly understandable.

Oh, and "take the jug handle" in NJ, which is also crystal clear to this bloke from CO.

Rotary, traffic circle, roundabout, .... dafuk.

Rick


Mythbusters tested this a while back and proved that the roundabout was more efficient than the 4 way stop junction and better than a Policeman on duty


Roundabouts win with 460 vehicles going through the intersection during the 15 minutes.  All way stop signs had 385 vehicles go through in the 15 minutes and the traffic cop had 289 vehicles go through.  Roundabouts also have a safety advantage with less severe crashes.


http://www.mikeontraffic.com/4-way-stop-vs-roundabout/
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Offline Rick Hall

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2018, 03:01:21 am »
Mythbusters tested this a while back and proved that the roundabout was more efficient than the 4 way stop junction and better than a Policeman on duty...

I was referring to the different naming conventions as you travel USA ;)

I have no doubt they are efficient, I've driven in EU! :)

In USA, you'll run into several types at a roundabout/rotary/circle/island.
1) Those that are petrified of a rotary (10%)
   1a) Those that have no idea what lane markings are for. (10%)
2) Those that drive what many of us call "Big Dick Flash-mobiles", who are so large/rich they think rules don't apply to them. (10%)
3) Drivers that think they're the only ones on the road. See #2.
4) Normal drivers that know what a rotary is, and how to merge into one (70%)

:)

Rick
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2018, 03:31:29 am »
I was referring to the different naming conventions as you travel USA ;)

I have no doubt they are efficient, I've driven in EU! :)

In USA, you'll run into several types at a roundabout/rotary/circle/island.
1) Those that are petrified of a rotary (10%)
   1a) Those that have no idea what lane markings are for. (10%)
2) Those that drive what many of us call "Big Dick Flash-mobiles", who are so large/rich they think rules don't apply to them. (10%)
3) Drivers that think they're the only ones on the road. See #2.
4) Normal drivers that know what a rotary is, and how to merge into one (70%)

:)

Rick

ahhhhh got you :)


Hmmm wonder what the 70% would make of the "magic roundabours"


https://www.wired.com/2016/08/brilliant-sorcery-englands-7-circle-magic-roundabout/
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Offline VirginiaJim

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2018, 05:32:52 am »
Wow, I was born near there!
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Offline Rhino

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #35 on: March 01, 2018, 06:39:44 am »
ahhhhh got you :)


Hmmm wonder what the 70% would make of the "magic roundabours"


https://www.wired.com/2016/08/brilliant-sorcery-englands-7-circle-magic-roundabout/

I don't know about that 7 circle insanity but we do see more and more roundabouts here in the US. They are definitely way better than a 4 way stop and in many cases better than a light IMO.

Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2018, 07:00:45 am »
Yeah, well the Dutch love the things (BTW- Americans usually call them rotaries but 'roundabout' is gaining ground apparently). In The Netherlands, one can see 3,4 sometimes even 6 or 7 different rotaries standing in one place!

They claim it is the only way to have cross traffic flow without having to interrupt either road with an actual stop. And I guess that is true enough, at least in theory. They are showing up more and more here in the Northeast US and while they may eventually be efficient, right now the two wrecked cars and the LEO cruiser with all  the flashing lights really slows traffic down to a crawl. :-(

Brian

Mythbusters tested this a while back and proved that the roundabout was more efficient than the 4 way stop junction and better than a Policeman on duty


Roundabouts win with 460 vehicles going through the intersection during the 15 minutes.  All way stop signs had 385 vehicles go through in the 15 minutes and the traffic cop had 289 vehicles go through.  Roundabouts also have a safety advantage with less severe crashes.


http://www.mikeontraffic.com/4-way-stop-vs-roundabout/
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Offline VirginiaJim

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2018, 09:57:18 am »
I've always called them roundabouts.  Never called them rotaries.
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Offline fartymarty

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #38 on: March 01, 2018, 10:20:31 am »
In USA, you'll run into several types at a roundabout/rotary/circle/island.
...........
4) Normal drivers that know what a rotary is, and how to merge into one (70%)

You may be a bit optimistic in some of those numbers, I'd put #4 around 50% and adjust the others up a bit.

Hmmm wonder what the 70% would make of the "magic roundabours"
https://www.wired.com/2016/08/brilliant-sorcery-englands-7-circle-magic-roundabout/

 :yikes:  :o :o :o   ???  at least 90%.

Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #39 on: March 01, 2018, 01:27:04 pm »
Yeah but you say 'whilst' too, which is not even a word so.....

I think a lot of the US calls them roundabouts also but here in beautiful, downtown New England we calls 'em rotaries. But hey, we measure our mileage in furlongs per hogshead too so it might be us that is off on this one.

Brian

I've always called them roundabouts.  Never called them rotaries.
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #40 on: March 01, 2018, 01:51:53 pm »
something not mentioned so far relates to buildings and where you enter them from street level.


Now we quite logically call that "Ground Level" not first floor ;

Although to cause confusion the Heath Hospital in Cardiff has an Upper Ground floor, a ground floor and a lower ground floor plus a basement and floors 1 to 4 (not 1 through 4)
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Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #41 on: March 01, 2018, 02:01:12 pm »
and why do you insist on calling the liquid fuel used in vehicles "gas"?


A gas powered car is on that runs on something like hydrogen or even LPG  :)
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Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #42 on: March 01, 2018, 02:11:59 pm »
Yeah, you call the second floor the first floor. Sorry Mike but I have to call you 'wrong' on this one. If you have a two floor house, and remove the first floor, are you not left with (gets out calculator and......) zero floors? Where is the first step on the ladder, the second one up? What about a multi- story building, is the 'first' floor on top of the 'other  first' floor?

 ;)

Brian

something not mentioned so far relates to buildings and where you enter them from street level.


Now we quite logically call that "Ground Level" not first floor ;

Although to cause confusion the Heath Hospital in Cardiff has an Upper Ground floor, a ground floor and a lower ground floor plus a basement and floors 1 to 4 (not 1 through 4)
Homo Sapiens Sapiens and just a tad of Neanderthal but it usually does not show....  My Private mail is blocked; it is not you, it is me, just like that dating partner said all those years ago. Please send an e-mail if you want to contact me privately.

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Online Conniesaki

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #43 on: March 01, 2018, 02:21:49 pm »
The lowest floor should be named "Ground / 1".

After all, it does have a floor, which is not just the ground (dirt).

For buildings on a side hill where the actual ground on one side of the bldg is higher or lower than the other by the height of 1 floor (or more), and yet the higher side is the main entrance/front of the building ... I dunno, call the lower level "Floor -1" or since that looks like "Floor dash one", spell it out "Floor Number Negative one".

 ???

 ;D

Offline mikeyw64

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Re: Differences between English and English (UK vs. US)
« Reply #44 on: March 01, 2018, 02:38:05 pm »
You're left with a bungalow :)
WHich still has its ground floor as you have taken the first floor away.

Actually many modern lifts/buildings use 0 for the Ground floor rather than G

Nope the second floor is on top of the first floor then the third and so on

Yeah, you call the second floor the first floor. Sorry Mike but I have to call you 'wrong' on this one. If you have a two floor house, and remove the first floor, are you not left with (gets out calculator and......) zero floors? Where is the first step on the ladder, the second one up? What about a multi- story building, is the 'first' floor on top of the 'other  first' floor?

 ;)

Brian
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