Author Topic: Iron Butt run  (Read 2685 times)

Offline DavidV

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Iron Butt run
« on: June 25, 2011, 12:17:30 pm »
  Had a couple of weeks of vacation so I decided to go and see a friend of mine in Carson Washington.  It is about 1978 mile from my home in Mustang, Oklahoma to Carson so I decided that somewhere on this trip would be a good time to do an Iron Butt run.
  I wasn’t going to get an early start on Sunday June 12th so I decided to go as far as I wanted and then start my Iron butt the next morning while it was cool. Good plan because when I left home it was 92 degrees and climbing fast. Before got out of Oklahoma my thermometer was reading 104degrees.
  I made it as far as Oakley, Ks, about 450 mile, and stayed in a cheap, but not too bad motel. The clerk was more than happy to sign my witness form so after a so, so night of sleep  I started out at 4:13 AM  from the gas station across the street from the motel.  The temps were perfect and as I hit I-70 West out of Oakley traffic was light and life was good.  Just over the Colorado boarder I took 385 North at Burlington, Co. That was to be the only two lane I would have on my Iron Butt run. I must have gone 50 miles before I passed my first car. About half way between Burlington Co. and I-80 in Nebraska I ran into some fog. At first it wasn’t too bad but it soon became so thick I had to slow down a little.  The fog began to burn off about the time I got into Nebraska.  I fueled up in Chappell, Neb. And took a short stretch.   I had traveled 242 miles in about 4 hours averaging about 60mph which with the fog wasn’t too bad. My Connie, a 2005 GZ1000, was running really well and averaged a little over 42 mpg. 
  The bike was somewhat new to me and I wasn’t quite sure how it would do on a trip like this. The most I had ridden it in one day previous to this trip was about 240 miles.  I had already figured out that the factory seat was the best factory seat I had ridden on; but it was still going to suck. I have Heli Bars on the bike, which have a lot of adjustment on them; but I could tell that before this trip was over I would suffer lots of shoulder and back pain. After a little over 4000 miles in a couple of weeks I was very right something would have to change.
  From Chappell, Neb. I set out on I-80 and would stay on I-80 for the next 600 or so miles. The weather was wonderful with the exception of a little rain just before entering Utah and a little after entering Utah.  Not a lot of rain but enough to make it interesting. There was a fairly stiff wind blowing from the North West  so I would be bucking a head wind for most of those 600 miles. I found that when I went around big trucks if I would start wide and then move closer to the truck before I broke out of its wind protection I would minimize the effect when passing.  I would be running between 80 and 85 most of the time so I passed a lot of trucks.
  Some people would have a problem running that much on the supper slab; but for me it is almost like a religious experience. Just me, my Lord and the motorcycle running down the road. Life is good.  I did have some problems with my GPS. I had a bad connection between the car cord and the GPS so it would restart about every ten or fifteen minutes.  I also have my tunes in the GPS and sometime I like to listen to them so just about the time I would get into a tune it would shut off and restart.  Just a minor irritation.
  I ran into another guy on a Connie that was headed for Montana, I think.  He had a Day Long seat on his and it looked like it might be comfy. That was just ouside Cheyenne, Wy. I don’t remember his name but he seemed to be a nice guy. Are all motorcycle guys nice? Something to ponder fro the next couple of hundred miles.
  Once I got into Utah the scenery really picked up and I seem to get a second wind. Hey Kansas was nice, a little flat, Neb was well, more flat, Wy was nice I could see some far off snow capped mountains; but I could have used a little less wind. But once I entered Utah the scenery got very good. The snow capped mountains were a lot closer. I wonder how much snow they got this year? I bet a lot.
  I did get stuck behind a truck that must have some really bad engine problems. It was blowing smoke so bad that I thought it was on fire. Just about the time I got ready to pass it I got a good blast of wind that blew his smoke directly toward me and it was full of raw diesel. It almost covered my windshield. Shortly afterward I ran into a little more rain. Guess what raw diesel and a little rain do to your windshield.  I stopped shortly to clean the windshield and get a little gas. By now it was raining pretty good so I took the time to eat a subway sandwich and wait for  the rain to quit. It didn’t quit so I put on my rain gear and started out again; but within 20 miles the rain was over for the trip.
  By now the sun was beginning to get low on the horizon and I was headed right into it. I had a tinted shield on my helmet but it was still very hard to see. I had brought some painters tape for this very reason, to block the sun,  but I knew that it was buried deep within one of my side cases. Which one? Oh well I guess I’ll just press on. Who needs to be able to see anyway??  I only had about a hundred miles or so to go.
  By the time I pulled into Boise, Id I was understanding why they called it a saddle Sore 1000. I got my final gas receipt and started looking for a motel. I could tell that I was getting a little punch drunk so I was looking foreword to hitting the hay. I stopped at the air port Best Western I figured they would have a good bed. I got the clerk to sign my end form, he said that he had signed others before. I then crashed. About 2 hours later I awoke with both legs cramping. How do you stand up when both legs are in a knot?  Man does that hurt. I knew immediately that I was dehydrated.  Every two hours or so I would wake up with cramps, get up and walk them out, sip water and then fall fast asleep. Even with the rude awakenings I still got a decent nights sleep. Amazing how quick I could go back to sleep after the rude awakenings.  I thought that I had hydrated enough on the trip but obviously I hadn’t.  On each stop I had water or a C2. While on the road I would sip a water bottle and every time I would stop I would get a fresh bottle of water to sip on the nest stretch of road. The temps weren’t even that high, mid to low 80s. Moral, hydrate! Hydrate!.
  Will I do another? At 63 I would want the bike to be a little more personalized, less butt and back pain. The bike did perform flawlessly, 39 to 50 mpg but I believe it could be a little more comfortable. If I had somewhere to go in a hurry I might do another; but I doubt if I would go with just a Iron Butt in mind. It was a great experience. Hydrate! Hydrate! Hydrate! Keep the rubber side down.
God Bless Dave.

Offline Summit670

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Re: Iron Butt run
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2011, 10:25:42 am »
Good story.  We stop every 150 miles or less and get fuel and drink at least 20 oz of water or gatorade.

Arctic Cat M8 163 rules

Sleds, Dirt Bikes, ATV's, Street Bikes, Mountain Bikes.  Heck, I guess if it has handlebars I'll give it a try.

Offline Ron Dawg

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Re: Iron Butt run
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2011, 11:46:39 am »
Way to go Dave! I've found while backpacking that a packet of McD's (or any other fastfood size portion)  salt thrown into the first aid kit is an instant relief for leg cramps due to dehydration. All water is great, but you lose electrolytes in your sweat. Just eat the contents of the little salt packet and in 2-3 minutes you're good. I've seen it time and again.

Great story. Thanks for sharing and congratulations.
Ron
2014 C-14 Red

Offline DavidV

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Re: Iron Butt run
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2011, 03:00:07 pm »
Ron
Good idea on the McDs salt packets. If there ever is another time I'll try that.
Thanks
Dave

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Iron Butt run the actual IRON BUTT
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2011, 09:50:06 am »
I'm watching Roger Sinclair right now, his spot is 30 minutes from the end checkpoint....he has till 10 west coast time to arrive....
I have been keeping him going every night with cross country conversation, to keep him awake and sharp when he starts to drift....
I think he is set to be a winner right now, and I'm really proud of him!!!
He has collected the 4800 points for Alaska, he'll get the 4800 points for getting in all the states, and he'll get huge bonus points for all the capitols he grabbed on this last leg....
I'll let you know who won in a couple hours!!!

46 YEARS OF KAW.....  47 years of DEVO..

Offline okxd45

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Re: Iron Butt run
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2011, 11:32:20 am »
Nice story from a fellow Okie (Well I've lived here about 11yrs all together)!  Also a Camelbak is nice for those long trips.  Camelbak also makes hydration tablets that you put in the water with the Magnesium, Potassium, Sodium, etc.  I was stationed at Hill AFB, UT from 2000-2001......beautiful country!  Thanks for the post!
Jeff
"Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under 't." Macbeth Quote (Act I, Scene V).
"I am sending you out like sheep among wolves. Therefore be as shrewd as snakes and as innocent as doves." (Matthew 10:16 NIV)