Author Topic: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT  (Read 7665 times)

Offline Romonov

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Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« on: May 08, 2018, 05:43:56 pm »
Hey guys!
I bought my 2012 last September and have had a great time, and as expected, it is time for new tires, and I’m close to buy Michelins, but would like to hear your opinion and recommendations.
What is your best choice?
Romo - Nov, they both belong to family names...I'm not Russian though ;-)

Offline lather

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2018, 06:06:36 pm »
Avon Storm 3D LM. I have not tried the PR 4 but but Avons have better grip and feel than the PR2 and PR3.
Nothing worse than having your balls go missing.

Offline Poseidon

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2018, 06:27:03 pm »
I just bought a set of Perrelli Angel GT's to replace my stock tires here in a few more weeks. I can't give a review yet, but there are several here that recommended them.
2017 Concours 14
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Offline Rubber_Snake

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2018, 06:43:20 pm »
Why, this has all the earmarks of a...



...TIRE THREAD!!!!


I have the Pilot Road 4 GTs.  Why?  Cuz the guy I bought the bike from swore by ‘em. 
I use AMSoil.  Why?  Same reason.
And I don’t even KNOW what brand brake pads are on it...

Wait for the Road 5 GTs to come out later this year.... :stirpot:

Actually, we used the Pilots on our BMW RT patrol bikes.  They gave us good grip and high mileage.  I got about 8k on my rear tire and could’ve easily gone another 1k before I swapped it out.  I don’t think you could go wrong with any of the three. 
2009 GTR 1400 ABS, 48k miles, AMSOIL synthetic 10W-40 (since new), AMSOIL synthetic 75W-90 final drive (since new). Helibar Horizons, Oxford heated grips, V-Stream windscreen, Mountain Runner Flash, Brian’s low fuel eliminator farkle, ST2 smart brake module and smart turn system, Two Brothers Black Series M5 w/P1X decibel killer.

Offline Romonov

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2018, 08:08:48 am »
Thanks a lot guys,
I’m ordering my Pilots 4!
Now! ... Installation, let’s see how I’ll do...planning on doing the whole thing myself for the first time ever   ;)
I’ll tell you guys about it.
Romo - Nov, they both belong to family names...I'm not Russian though ;-)

Offline Tree

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2018, 08:44:15 am »
[snip] ... Installation... [snip]...planning on doing the whole thing myself for the first time ever...[snip]
I’ll tell you guys about it.

Oh boy.   :popcorn:

Offline just gone

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2018, 10:32:47 am »
Now! ... Installation, let’s see how I’ll do...planning on doing the whole thing myself for the first time ever   ;)
I’ll tell you guys about it.

Some first time gotchas to avoid:
1)Loosening the front pinch bolts on the wrong side. Remember that "the right side is the right side (aka the correct side).
2) Breaking the bead right over the TPMS and thus breaking the TPMS into two or more pieces....... Don't do that!
3) Failure to protect your brake disks when breaking the tire bead, or just letting the wheel fall over and land on the disk.  :doh:
4) Mounting the tires spinning the wrong way.......... Look at the arrows on the tires and on the front wheel. (I don't think the back wheel has an arrow but...maybe? Regardless the rear tire will have arrows)
5) Mounting the front wheel with the ABS/TC sensor disk on the left instead of the right.
6) Forgetting to get the moly lube for the rear wheel splines before you start, or forgetting to lube it at all.
7) Mounting the wheels back on the bike properly torquing everything, then remembering that they still need to be balanced.

Numbers 2 and 3 are the most important gotchas to avoid, as it gets expensive and can eat up the money you save by doing it yourself.

Other tips: Yes the beads and wheel rims can be lubed with just a rag and some soapy water, but I recommend just buying or re-purposing a spray bottle and using it to apply
lube. When the tire doesn't slip right on for you the first time, it's so much easier to just use a spray bottle to re-lube it.

If you are struggling and sweating...take a break. Watch some Youtube tire changing videos or something.

If you are using a MoJo lever, when mounting the tire, remember it's purpose is not to force the bead down over the rim, it's to push the bead out past the rim so that it
can drop down past the rim on it's own as you move the lever out of it's way.

About the TPMS, place a bright colored sticky note to the wheel where the TPMS is to remind you it's there. It'll be one of the things you forget about if things don't go
smoothly at first and you start struggling in frustration.

I don't offer this as some sort of tire changing expert, but as someone that has learned this the hard way or has come very close to that (depending on the gotcha).
   :hail: Justcliff would be the expert, as he just does it on the floor with tire irons.  :hail:


Offline katata1100

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2018, 10:43:52 am »
I’m picking up my front tire with a pr4 GTO today. I think Cycle Gear charges just $25 for mount and
balence.
According to the announcement from Michelin, the GT version of the new 5 won’t be out until 2019, not this year. Whether they mean 1/19 or 12/19, is anyone’s guess. As my front is almost down to the wear bars, I reluctantly got another pr4 gt.

Offline maxtog

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2018, 03:01:22 pm »
I like PR4GT, but I would never attempt to mount them myself :)
Shoodaben (was Guhl) Mountain Runner ECU flash, Canyon Cages front/rear, Helibars risers, Phil's wedges, Grip Puppies, Sargent World seat-low & heated & pod, Muzzy lowering links, Soupy's stand, Nautilus air horn, Admore lightbar, Ronnie's highway pegs, front running lights, all LED, helmet locks, RAM Xgrip, Sena SMH10, Throttle Tamer, MRA X-Creen, BearingUp Shifter, PR4-GT, Scorpion EXO-T1200,etc

Offline Rubber_Snake

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2018, 03:54:30 pm »
I’m picking up my front tire with a pr4 GTO today. I think Cycle Gear charges just $25 for mount and
balence.
According to the announcement from Michelin, the GT version of the new 5 won’t be out until 2019, not this year. Whether they mean 1/19 or 12/19, is anyone’s guess. As my front is almost down to the wear bars, I reluctantly got another pr4 gt.
If you buy the tires thru them, mount and balance is free.  Otherwise, I was quoted $50 to mount with balancing free. 
2009 GTR 1400 ABS, 48k miles, AMSOIL synthetic 10W-40 (since new), AMSOIL synthetic 75W-90 final drive (since new). Helibar Horizons, Oxford heated grips, V-Stream windscreen, Mountain Runner Flash, Brian’s low fuel eliminator farkle, ST2 smart brake module and smart turn system, Two Brothers Black Series M5 w/P1X decibel killer.

Offline Rubber_Snake

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2018, 04:05:29 pm »
Some first time gotchas to avoid:
1)Loosening the front pinch bolts on the wrong side. Remember that "the right side is the right side (aka the correct side).
2) Breaking the bead right over the TPMS and thus breaking the TPMS into two or more pieces....... Don't do that!
3) Failure to protect your brake disks when breaking the tire bead, or just letting the wheel fall over and land on the disk.  :doh:
4) Mounting the tires spinning the wrong way.......... Look at the arrows on the tires and on the front wheel. (I don't think the back wheel has an arrow but...maybe? Regardless the rear tire will have arrows)
5) Mounting the front wheel with the ABS/TC sensor disk on the left instead of the right.
6) Forgetting to get the moly lube for the rear wheel splines before you start, or forgetting to lube it at all.
7) Mounting the wheels back on the bike properly torquing everything, then remembering that they still need to be balanced.

Numbers 2 and 3 are the most important gotchas to avoid, as it gets expensive and can eat up the money you save by doing it yourself.

Other tips: Yes the beads and wheel rims can be lubed with just a rag and some soapy water, but I recommend just buying or re-purposing a spray bottle and using it to apply
lube. When the tire doesn't slip right on for you the first time, it's so much easier to just use a spray bottle to re-lube it.

If you are struggling and sweating...take a break. Watch some Youtube tire changing videos or something.

If you are using a MoJo lever, when mounting the tire, remember it's purpose is not to force the bead down over the rim, it's to push the bead out past the rim so that it
can drop down past the rim on it's own as you move the lever out of it's way.

About the TPMS, place a bright colored sticky note to the wheel where the TPMS is to remind you it's there. It'll be one of the things you forget about if things don't go
smoothly at first and you start struggling in frustration.

I don't offer this as some sort of tire changing expert, but as someone that has learned this the hard way or has come very close to that (depending on the gotcha).
   :hail: Justcliff would be the expert, as he just does it on the floor with tire irons.  :hail:

Good advice FM.  I’m recently the proud owner of the Fred Harmon (FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY) maintenance DVD set and have been learning so much.  I missed #6 and need to go back and take care of that.
2009 GTR 1400 ABS, 48k miles, AMSOIL synthetic 10W-40 (since new), AMSOIL synthetic 75W-90 final drive (since new). Helibar Horizons, Oxford heated grips, V-Stream windscreen, Mountain Runner Flash, Brian’s low fuel eliminator farkle, ST2 smart brake module and smart turn system, Two Brothers Black Series M5 w/P1X decibel killer.

Offline Romonov

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2018, 04:54:43 pm »
Thanks so much for the summary, I was kind of counting on this type of feedback and, Man! FM you went professional on the subject! Great information!
I still think it’s worth giving it a try, and go ahead with the installation, but just in case will check if there is a Cycle Gear that could provide the service.
Again, thanks everyone.
Romo - Nov, they both belong to family names...I'm not Russian though ;-)

Offline katata1100

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2018, 05:34:28 pm »
If you buy the tires thru them, mount and balance is free.  Otherwise, I was quoted $50 to mount with balancing free.

No, they charge $25 if you get the tire from them, $50 if you got the tire from someone else.
They also offer road hazard coverage for extra $.

https://www.cyclegear.com/tire-install-service

Offline just gone

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2018, 05:51:50 pm »
...... but just in case will check if there is a Cycle Gear that could provide the service.

Some Cycle Gears are good and some....Just be sure they are aware of the TPMS and that you expect them to replace it if they break it. Saying that as I was dropping off the wheel at my Cycle Gear years ago, made us come to a mutual decision that I should go somewhere else.

1)Loosening the front pinch bolts on the wrong side. Remember that "the right side is the right side (aka the correct side).

Possible OOPS!?

It has occurred to me that a previous owner, previous tech, previous Cycle gear, could have removed everything and put it back in differently left to right. I'm 99% certain that from the factory all the axle shafts go in/and come out from the right side (loosen pinch bolts) and the nut (threaded collar) is on the left (don't loosen pinch bolts). There is no guarantee that yours is that way, so just to be sure, peer in the axle hole with a flashlight to verify that the threads are on the left side (it's also the end of the axle that has about a 5/8th-3/4 in. long section where the inside diameter is smaller). Regardless, the side with the threads visible (nut) is the side you do not want to loosen. (although it's not the end of the world, it just slows everything down)



Best wishes!

Offline katata1100

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2018, 07:36:58 pm »
A non dealer shop busted the rear sensor on my bike. They paid for the sender and the cost to have it
programmed .
The guy at cycle gear said it wouldn’t be a problem, said they get busted when tire is removed, with the tool going into the tpsm.  He said he’d make sure that doesn’t happen.

Offline Rubber_Snake

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2018, 11:45:17 pm »
No, they charge $25 if you get the tire from them, $50 if you got the tire from someone else.
They also offer road hazard coverage for extra $.

https://www.cyclegear.com/tire-install-service
Okay, I couldn’t remember cuz I had already taken my tire off and mounted it before I brought it to them. 

Well, that and the fact I can’t remember jack schmidt!   :doh:
2009 GTR 1400 ABS, 48k miles, AMSOIL synthetic 10W-40 (since new), AMSOIL synthetic 75W-90 final drive (since new). Helibar Horizons, Oxford heated grips, V-Stream windscreen, Mountain Runner Flash, Brian’s low fuel eliminator farkle, ST2 smart brake module and smart turn system, Two Brothers Black Series M5 w/P1X decibel killer.

Offline Justcliff

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2018, 05:59:17 am »
Avon Storm 3D LM. I have not tried the PR 4 but but Avons have better grip and feel than the PR2 and PR3.

I'm with lather on this, 3D-XM's for me. I've had 3 sets of the PR4's along with the 2's & 3's. To me each one was a downgrade from the previous model.


   :hail: Justcliff would be the expert, as he just does it on the floor with tire irons.  :hail:


I just mounted my 38th set of tires on my C14. Yes I do spoon them on like Marty said. I'm by no means a expert I just never found it to be a big deal to do. Some quality spoons, my homemade bead breaker, box/crate to keep wheel off the floor & the yellow thing is all that's needed.

One thing I'll add to Marty's list is, lay the tires out in the sun for a while. I've done them stone cold in the winter & left them out in the sun for hours. Mounting a warm tire verses a cold tire is night & day difference.

I have loads of room to mount a changer, just never felt the need for one.

My neighbor is a dealer & I can use his air operated machine anytime I want at no cost. His shop is 15 miles away. I can be done quicker than I can make the 30 mile round trip. 
Cliff

2008 C14, 235,000 miles & counting!  2014 V-Strom 1000
IBA#66047

Offline Romonov

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2018, 10:30:40 pm »
Hey guys,

After starting this topic and receiving your recommendations on changing the tires of my 2012 concours, I started by changing my mind on the type of tires… Poseidon mentioned the Pirelli Angel GT, made some search and decided to buy them instead of the Michelin. “fartmarty” gave us a very comprehensive set of instructions that served me as a great guide for my project.
Let me start with the best advice from “fartmarty”:

If you are struggling and sweating...take a break. Watch some Youtube tire changing videos or something.

I did exactly that, in fact several times! the whole project took me 4 days; several trips to different stores to buy and/or change supplies such as paint, tools, bolts and whatnot!

Based on the videos from Windy Urtnowski about using “Gorilla” tape to install the new tires, I proceeded to implement the process, and after a few attempts following every instruction from the video on the rear tire, I decided most definitely that “I hate Windy”!!!!!   ;D
I had to change the plan, and using the Motion-Pro tire bead breakers, with the rim protectors; very good tools indeed, if you know how to use them! I had to paint the edge of the rim three times before the tire was installed! I learned the hard way, that you really must know how to use the tools.
Once the tire was out and the rim free and clean, I took a look at the TPMS, it was broken and had to do some plastic welding and use some ciano-acrylate. I also watched this very good video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTXTz2pBzR4

I have the same low battery and rear tire pressure until the bike heats up, then it works perfectly. Most probably will have to change the battery by winter time, whenever it’s too cold for riding. I will then revisit the process again. Also, for whomever is interested, this link would help a lot in order to find the right battery for this kind of work:

https://console5.com/store/panasonic-cr2032-3v-lithium-battery-with-solder-tabs-pins.html

 When I was waiting for the paint to dry, took some time to work on the tap of the transmission oil deposit that the previous owner damaged with a flat screwdriver. Eliminate the black paint, polish the cap and with the help of my son using the “cricut” machine from my wife, painted green “K” on it…I think it came out rather nice!


 
Time for the front wheel, as you all know, after going through some of the problems of the rear tire. I tried to find a 13/16 “ spark plug socket that would allow me to use my extension to loose the 22mm front axle nut, but all what is available in the market has an rounded smaller inside, that does fit the tools. I had to improvise and found a car wheel nut and a 22mm socket for my wrench, this made the job!

 

Problem was that when starting to undo the two bolts on the right leg of the fork, I discover they were really loose, and that got me really worried! Looking at the tire wear profile it was even more evident, and I wonder if the forks are working properly:

 

When mounting the new tire, and using the gorilla tape method, I came to love Windy Urtnowski again…it worked like a charm! This time the TPMS is in good condition and thanks to the recommendation from “fartmarty” to place a big mark where the valve is, there were no problems with it. I even took the opportunity to clean the brake pads very well. There is one problem with the screws that hold the calipers, they are worn out and I must find replacements very soon…does anyone know how to get them?

I imagine that just as the rest of you when finishing some mod, I am very satisfied with the final state of my bike, and can’t wait for tomorrow’s ride… let’s see how it goes!


Romo - Nov, they both belong to family names...I'm not Russian though ;-)

Offline Poseidon

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2018, 02:22:13 am »
2017 Concours 14
2016 Victory Magnum
2013 M109R
2016 Can Am Spyder F3T - Wife's bike

Offline Romonov

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Re: Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2018, 03:45:01 pm »
Romo - Nov, they both belong to family names...I'm not Russian though ;-)