Author Topic: Sorry...another seat post/question...  (Read 1258 times)

Offline PH14

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Re: Sorry...another seat post/question...
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2018, 11:42:09 am »

Regular sergeant- must say it looks great- came with silver piping to match my atomic silver paint. Much more comfy than stock. However, with 25k miles on it, not so much. It shoves me into the tank
and cushion seams to have disappeared, feels more like a Corbin . I have a rock hard Corbin on my Suzuki but that works because the seat shape is perfect for me. But the shape of the sergeant isn’t ideal . I’m going cross country next summer and I’ll likely get a Kawasaki touring seat.

That was my experience as well. Initially, and for some time after, the Sargent seat was great, I do like the shape though. After around 20,000 miles, give or take 5,000, I forget how many, the foam broke down enough that it no lover have the support necessary in the front, and you were pushed forward. Great seat until that happened.

Corbin made some great seats for many different bikes, but I cannot fathom why they decided to make the C14 seat shaped like one designed for a cruiser. The shape, for me, simply does not work well on the C14. I do wish I had originally simply cut down the hump in the front part of the seat. The seat does make a nice platform for an Airhawk though.

Offline maxtog

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Re: Sorry...another seat post/question...
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2018, 11:47:15 am »
Well, in all fairness, I am not sure any foam in any seat (or chair or whatever) will last but so long before it starts to lose its spring/form/support.  It probably depends on the quality and type of foam, but also how often it is used, weight, and environmental conditions (like how long it sits in the sun being heated, humidity, temperature cycling).   I am sure some lasts longer than others.
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Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Sorry...another seat post/question...
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2018, 01:47:58 pm »
This has been my experience: in the end (very small pun intended), a mold-able, conforming saddle surface is needed for my own, as well as my wife's, long time riding comfort. Even a saddle that was shaped exactly to fit a person, such as sitting on rigid foam while it hardened (yeah, couple jokes in there somewhere too) would not fit as well once clothes were changed, and the riding position was changed in any amount at all. An air (water would also work but not gel) cushion or actual saddle will always conform to the area above it and even compensate for any lumps (Easy Boys!- I mean like a wallet!). After trying out several saddles, including custom made types, we have found that only an air cushion provides us with the ability to spend eight, ten or more hours in the saddle without discomfort, if not outright pain; A stock Corbin will limit my own riding time to 45 minutes and then I am done for at least 12 hours due to discomfort.

Considering the above, what has worked best for us has been the Corbin, not because it is a 'good' saddle in and of itself but because it is a wide, [close to] flat surface that extends somewhat forward, and gives excellent area for an air cushion. It is actually the cushion that is providing the actual comfort.

The saddle / air cushion combo. is not without its problems though; the cushions are subject to damage / leaks, can be stolen easily, and require some fiddling to get them situated correctly over the saddle as well as filled with the right amount of air. The tendency is to over- fill them by quite a lot, and that is like riding on a beach- ball and I believe a prime reason why some people who try them do not like them at all. Properly filled, you really do not feel like you are floating above the actual saddle at all, in fact, it does not feel like it is even there or actually doing anything.

Brian

That was my experience as well. Initially, and for some time after, the Sargent seat was great, I do like the shape though. After around 20,000 miles, give or take 5,000, I forget how many, the foam broke down enough that it no lover have the support necessary in the front, and you were pushed forward. Great seat until that happened.

Corbin made some great seats for many different bikes, but I cannot fathom why they decided to make the C14 seat shaped like one designed for a cruiser. The shape, for me, simply does not work well on the C14. I do wish I had originally simply cut down the hump in the front part of the seat. The seat does make a nice platform for an Airhawk though.

Well, in all fairness, I am not sure any foam in any seat (or chair or whatever) will last but so long before it starts to lose its spring/form/support.  It probably depends on the quality and type of foam, but also how often it is used, weight, and environmental conditions (like how long it sits in the sun being heated, humidity, temperature cycling).   I am sure some lasts longer than others.
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Offline PH14

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Re: Sorry...another seat post/question...
« Reply #18 on: October 28, 2018, 03:44:44 pm »
This has been my experience: in the end (very small pun intended), a mold-able, conforming saddle surface is needed for my own, as well as my wife's, long time riding comfort. Even a saddle that was shaped exactly to fit a person, such as sitting on rigid foam while it hardened (yeah, couple jokes in there somewhere too) would not fit as well once clothes were changed, and the riding position was changed in any amount at all. An air (water would also work but not gel) cushion or actual saddle will always conform to the area above it and even compensate for any lumps (Easy Boys!- I mean like a wallet!). After trying out several saddles, including custom made types, we have found that only an air cushion provides us with the ability to spend eight, ten or more hours in the saddle without discomfort, if not outright pain; A stock Corbin will limit my own riding time to 45 minutes and then I am done for at least 12 hours due to discomfort.

Considering the above, what has worked best for us has been the Corbin, not because it is a 'good' saddle in and of itself but because it is a wide, [close to] flat surface that extends somewhat forward, and gives excellent area for an air cushion. It is actually the cushion that is providing the actual comfort.

The saddle / air cushion combo. is not without its problems though; the cushions are subject to damage / leaks, can be stolen easily, and require some fiddling to get them situated correctly over the saddle as well as filled with the right amount of air. The tendency is to over- fill them by quite a lot, and that is like riding on a beach- ball and I believe a prime reason why some people who try them do not like them at all. Properly filled, you really do not feel like you are floating above the actual saddle at all, in fact, it does not feel like it is even there or actually doing anything.

Brian

Yep, the Corbin is a great platform for a cushion like the Airhawk. I actually prefer a firm seat, provided it is shaped properly, for me. I could save money on a vasectomy if I rode the Corbin though, the hump in the front would render me useless anyway after riding very long. If they would have made the seat as I requested, and as they said they would, all would be well. Had they removed the original foam, and rebuilt it as requested, and as they said they would when it was in for foam replacement and reshaping, all would be well, but they didn't, they simply overlaid the old foam, in its original bad shape, with softer foam. The result is the same, the softer foam simply smashed down and adjusts its shape to match the firmer foam underneath, causing the same issue. Truly sad since the new shape is great, a flatter, seat, more like they put on every other sport bike and sport touring bike in the past.