Author Topic: Basic Carb Cleaning  (Read 625 times)

Offline sport rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Basic Carb Cleaning
« on: October 13, 2019, 10:37:21 am »
had a great day yesterday taking care of a nagging issue.  bike was not running on one cylinder at idle.  the bike is ridden a lot, so I figured it was dirt and not gummed up from fuel.  took both lower fairings off, pulled out the carbs.  flipped them over and didn't detach the throttle cables.  removed each bowl one at a time.  pulled both pilot and main jets.  cleaned them and gently blew some air though to be sure passages were clear as best I could.  put it all back together and she purred like a kitten just like she should.  I put an inline filter on the fuel line just to be sure to trap any dirt from getting in again.

this is all thanks to the information posted here and other sites.  There is a ton of C10 data out there along with videos and diagrams.  Makes working on these bikes SO much easier!

thanks to those that went before and took the time to document and post details!

Offline gPink

  • Arena
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5544
  • Country: us
  • MMVIII C XIV
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2019, 06:13:47 pm »
A twofer...fixed the bike and got rid of the nagging issue. So where did you send her?
Thank God for good men willing to do extreme violence.

Offline sport rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2019, 07:40:03 am »
I'm old enough to know the proper response to that is "no comment".   ;D ;D ;D

Offline RFH87_Connie

  • Arena
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 942
  • Country: us
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2019, 08:06:22 am »
If you get anything similar to a fuel starving issue, remove that fuel filter.  Sometimes it will only occur when the tank is almost empty and head pressure is low.
“I can truly say I had rather be at home at Mount Vernon with a friend or two about me, than to be attended at the seat of government by the officers of State and the representatives of every power of Europe.” - George Washington

Offline sport rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2019, 11:07:11 am »
will monitor.  thanks!

Offline Daytona_Mike

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 778
  • Country: us
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2019, 09:36:13 pm »
I don't understand the point of adding a second filter when the  in tank filter has an equal to or finer micron level than the add-on inline filter.  An inline cannot filter anymore than the first one so basically all an online does is add  an additional point of failure . Examples: vapor lock and lowered  / restricted fuel pressure
If you still have fuel in the tank, you are not lost yet
Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle

Offline sport rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2019, 07:55:22 am »
what I found in my tank when I cleaned it out was a very fine powdery sediment.  I also found this in the bowls.  the screen in the tank was obviously not able to protect from that fine of a material.  While I don't know the filter level of the in-line I installed, I can only say it's worth a shot (to me) to try to avoid further problem.

Offline Daytona_Mike

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 778
  • Country: us
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2019, 02:53:15 pm »
what I found in my tank when I cleaned it out was a very fine powdery sediment.  I also found this in the bowls.  the screen in the tank was obviously not able to protect from that fine of a material.  While I don't know the filter level of the in-line I installed, I can only say it's worth a shot (to me) to try to avoid further problem.
I wonder if the powdery sediment is from ethanol evaporating. When I stopped adding TCW3 oil in with my gas it was not long after that I had to remove the carbs and send them to be cleaned/jets unclogged. The carbs were coated with this yellowish powdery substance. I removed and cleaned the tank and  due to being scolded about not  adding TCW3 I never forgot to do it again.
Long ago i did the inline filter (before there was overflow tubes)  as recommended on this forum. That was the only times the bike had to be towed/trailered home due to vapor locking.  Well, there was one other time when I  scrubbed brand new  tires down  to the cords chasing down a Speed Tripple and  both tires blew.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2019, 03:35:00 pm by Daytona_Mike »
If you still have fuel in the tank, you are not lost yet
Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle

Offline MAN OF BLUES

  • Arena
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2734
  • Country: 00
  • WHISKEY.Tango.Foxtrot.
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2019, 05:34:53 pm »
Disolved "feric/iron" salts, picked up and carried on the fuel/water, from tank to float bowls... Invisible as a solid during the formation, but once allowed to "sit" in the aluminum floatbowl, electrons bonding occurs, and they re-form into "larger" crystals, which you see after storage.. filtration is ineffective for removing the dissolved microscopic structure.. it's basically like dissolved into the solution.. and only 're-forms" when it sets in the bowls.. in the presence of oxygen., then sticks to the surfaces of the bowl, as fuel evaps.

Having had "cheapo" clear plastic filters, on various bikes, and never "seeing" any contaminants, but having the filter body break, and an inopportune time, dumping fuel, and requiring an "emergency splice on the road".. I choos not to ever have that happen again, and the metal "can" NAPA filters, just don't cut it for me, as I can't see the fuel in them either...

Just my personal observations, and if the bike is run regularly, and during storage, tank topped up, and stabilizer used, and no "half tank air with moisture" sitting.. it's about as good as you can do. No filter, that will flow fuel well, will prevent that "micro migration", as the iron is dissolved, in the liquids.

30 YEARS OF KAW.....

Offline VirginiaJim

  • Administrator
  • Elite Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10752
  • Country: england
  • I've forgotten more than I'll ever know...
    • Kawasaki 1400GTR
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2019, 05:35:35 pm »
I wonder if the powdery sediment is from ethanol evaporating. ...


Nah, it's cocaine...
"LOCTITE®"  The original thread locker...  #11  2016 Indian Roadmaster, ABS, Cruise control, heated grips and seats 46 Monitoring with cutting edge technology U.N.I.T is Back! 2008 C14 Moved on to a new home.

Offline Boomer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 367
  • Country: gb
  • Wickford, UK
    • Boomers GTR Site
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2019, 05:14:56 am »
The brown powder is iron-oxide (rust) from the gas tank, mostly dissolved in the gas/ethanol and then deposited if the gas evaporates from the bowls when left standing for a long time. Drain the bowls if parking the bike for a substantial length of time.

The white powder is aluminium-oxide (yes I spell and say it the ENGLISH way!!  ;D) that comes from the carb itself.
You can prevent this by adding a tiny amount of 2-stroke oil to the gas (as recommended by SiSF and others) and then running the bike until the 2-stroke mix has replace all the gas in the float bowls. Then drain the bowls prior to parking her for the winter. The 2-stroke oil will coat the bowl surface and prevent the oxidisation of the aluminium.

If you have a lot of either, you have a major problem. A small amount is normal.
George "Boomer" Garratt
Wickford, UK


Offline sport rider

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Basic Carb Cleaning
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2019, 12:49:59 pm »
Disolved "feric/iron" salts, picked up and carried on the fuel/water, from tank to float bowls... Invisible as a solid during the formation, but once allowed to "sit" in the aluminum floatbowl, electrons bonding occurs, and they re-form into "larger" crystals, which you see after storage.. filtration is ineffective for removing the dissolved microscopic structure.. it's basically like dissolved into the solution.. and only 're-forms" when it sets in the bowls.. in the presence of oxygen., then sticks to the surfaces of the bowl, as fuel evaps.

Having had "cheapo" clear plastic filters, on various bikes, and never "seeing" any contaminants, but having the filter body break, and an inopportune time, dumping fuel, and requiring an "emergency splice on the road".. I choos not to ever have that happen again, and the metal "can" NAPA filters, just don't cut it for me, as I can't see the fuel in them either...

Just my personal observations, and if the bike is run regularly, and during storage, tank topped up, and stabilizer used, and no "half tank air with moisture" sitting.. it's about as good as you can do. No filter, that will flow fuel well, will prevent that "micro migration", as the iron is dissolved, in the liquids.

my bikes never get stored nor sit for too long.  I trade off riding them to keep them all healthy.  having said that, this tank is a new-to-me one which was on a bike which had sat. 

will practice all the ideas promoted here to try to keep it healthy. 

we really need a "like" button for all the great comments and humor here!   ;D