Author Topic: Changing the air filter - for noobies.  (Read 18739 times)

Offline C1xRider

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Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« on: July 22, 2011, 11:38:53 am »
My bike is at 15K miles, and since I just bought a new K&N for it (see this thread http://www.zggtr.org/index.php?topic=2667.0)  I thought I would share what was involved for me to change the air filter on my 2010.  I'm sure the procedure is basically the same for other years.  It's certainly not as easy as an old car, but it's not a dealer only task either.

If you have small to normal sized hands (not bear paws or baseball mits), it makes the job a little easier, as you don't have to remove the upper fairing and windshield.

Tools needed were :
4mm Allen wrench,
5mm Allen wrench,
8mm 1/4" drive socket (5/16" 6 point will also work)
10mm 1/4" drive socket (19/32" 6 point will also work)
New air filter  ::)


To start with, I parked the bike with the windshield all the way up (hold windshield control button while turning off the key switch), and the handlebars to the right lock.  A quick test if your hands are too big for my procedure will be if you can remove and re-install the plastic rivet at the top of the dash behind the windshield, without removing the windshield.

The filter is located on the left side of the frame, just below the storage compartment on the 2010.  I removed the relay cover between the gas cap and the handle bars (3 - 5MM Allen screws), and the storage compartment (3 - 4mm Allen screws, 1 - 5mm Allen screw, plastic rivet at top of dash, 3 wiring connectors).

Once the plastic is out of the way, there is a shiny cover bolted to the side of the frame, and the filter is behind it.  To get to it, requires moving more stuff out of the way.

There is a foam heat barrier directly in the way that is held in place by 2 10mm bolts (socket head cap screws).  One is threaded into the frame and is easily visible, while the other is hidden near the lower, back side of the panel.  This is where hand size comes into play.  Getting to these bolts was tight for me, but with larger hands, you would need to remove the side fairing.

After the heat panel was moved to the side, the relays above the tank and wiring also needed to be pulled loose from their mount tabs to get clear access to the filter cover.  The cover is held in place by 2 8mm bolts.  Once the bolts and cover are removed, the filter requires some work to get it out, as it's a tight fit.  There is a wedge with slots on the exposed side of the filter, that you can hook into for pulling the filter out.

Getting the filter to clear the side fairing was pretty easy, and just required rotating it down behind the fairing, then straight up and out.

Assembly was simply the reverse of dis-assembly, with no surprises.  The K&N fit even tighter than the stock one, and had me wondering if something was not lined up right at first.  It did eventually relent, and seated properly once all the way in.

Getting the lower bolt in the heat barrier was a bit tricky, but using a short extension with the socket allowed for something to hold onto while aligning and starting the bolt.  Also, make sure the rubber relay covers up top slip back over the mount tabs completely.

Also, be sure you do not drop anything behind the plastics, since it may prove very difficult finding where it went if it doesn't fall out the bottom.  I dropped the plastic rivet while installing it, and it fell into the slot where the windshield mount comes through the plastic.  It rattled it's way down into a spot near the bottom of the fairing, that had no way out.  When I finally found it, I also found another one there with it.  Not sure how it got there, since it wasn't one I lost, but it's probably been there awhile.  So, now I have a spare.   :)

As a bonus for installing the new filter, I noticed there is now a little less vibration at speed.  It was not drastic or dramatic, but definitely better.  Since the vibs from my bike have always been there since day one, I have to conclude its the K&N that helped it.

The picture below helps illustrate things a little...
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Offline stevewfl

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2011, 12:48:26 pm »
awesome how-to for the nooBs.

On a side note, I change mine every 25,000 miles or so. Here's the condition of my filters at that mileage:

old


new
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Offline B.D.F.

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2011, 05:29:04 pm »
That looks like a LOT of work for the newbies. Is there a different procedure for us oldies that is any easier?   ;D

Nice write up. The procedure is a little different on the earlier models because the relays were originally on the left hand side, just outside the filter's path when it is changed.

Brian


My bike is at 15K miles, and since I just bought a new K&N for it (see this thread http://www.zggtr.org/index.php?topic=2667.0)  I thought I would share what was involved for me to change the air filter on my 2010.  I'm sure the procedure is basically the same for other years.  It's certainly not as easy as an old car, but it's not a dealer only task either.

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Offline ZedHed

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2011, 02:48:16 pm »
That looks like a LOT of work for the newbies. Is there a different procedure for us oldies that is any easier?   ;D

Nice write up. The procedure is a little different on the earlier models because the relays were originally on the left hand side, just outside the filter's path when it is changed.

Brian

Nope, my '08 was just as involved.  I changed mine at 15k - it wasn't as dirty as Steve's but cruddy nevertheless.  It's too bad that so much plastic has to be removed, but that is the "nature of the beast."  I chose to take care of other maintenance tasks at the same time (steering bearing lube, throttlebody sync, coolant change, etc.)
« Last Edit: July 23, 2011, 09:20:22 pm by ZedHed »
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Offline Necron99

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2011, 04:44:01 pm »
Thanks for the write up...I'll reference it when it's time, as I bought a K&N off Amazon on a nice sale.  But I think it's REALLY cool the trick about the windshield.  LOL  I had to run out to the garage to give it a try.  I'm annoyed with things going back to a default setting.  Now if only that trick worked to keep eco mode on.
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Offline tundra dweller

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2011, 07:22:40 pm »
The C-14 filter gets dirty faster than anything I've seen. For sure don't let go as far as Steve's. ;D
I'm checking mine every 10,000 from now on. That ram air sucks in bugs, birds, small children, compact cars..........wel....bugs for sure.
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Offline Maverick

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2011, 12:52:45 am »
I put the BMC air filter on mine, I just have to clean it every now and then...no replacement.
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Offline KawiMick

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2013, 09:37:56 am »
There is a foam heat barrier directly in the way that is held in place by 2 10mm bolts (socket head cap screws).  One is threaded into the frame and is easily visible, while the other is hidden near the lower, back side of the panel.  This is where hand size comes into play.  Getting to these bolts was tight for me, but with larger hands, you would need to remove the side fairing.



Just to add a little trick to C1X's post, I cut my heat shield bracket so that
all I have to do is loosen the two bolts, not remove them.  It makes filter check/changes much easier.  Here is a picture with one of the cuts circled in yellow:


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Offline smokin

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Offline VirginiaJim

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2016, 04:23:15 am »
Does seem kinda pricey, doesn't it?
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Offline smokin

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2016, 05:44:41 pm »
Not really, a genuine Kawasaki air filter for a GTR1400 is approximately  A$79.00,a K&N air filter is approximately A$129.00 here in Australia.
For interest sakes what is the cost of a new Kawasaki Concours C14 in the USA?
A new GTR 1400 Kawasaki is approx. A$25,000.00 plus on road costs in Australia a little cheaper if there is a promotion on. 98 octane fuel is around A$130.00 to a  A$149.00 per litre. 4.6ltrs = 1gallon approx.
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Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2016, 08:51:47 pm »
Not really, a genuine Kawasaki air filter for a GTR1400 is approximately  A$79.00,a K&N air filter is approximately A$129.00 here in Australia.
For interest sakes what is the cost of a new Kawasaki Concours C14 in the USA?
A new GTR 1400 Kawasaki is approx. A$25,000.00 plus on road costs in Australia a little cheaper if there is a promotion on. 98 octane fuel is around A$130.00 to a  A$149.00 per litre. 4.6ltrs = 1gallon approx.

what the.....? come on, price per litre?

may take up walking soon eh?

USA price on oem air filters are quite cheap, might want to check, and I'll split the difference and send you one...

price here is $40-60 depending where purchased, I'll send ya one for $70 US.

complete bikes here run about $15,000 new....

and you don't need 98 octane fuel... 89 works fine.... we buy it here for about $2.30 a US gallon,  or approximatly $14.00 a fill up.

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Offline smokin

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Re: Changing the air filter - for noobies.
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2016, 10:46:29 pm »
Australia is the land of "milk and honey", but it will cost you. Where as America is the land of opportunity because every thing is so "bloody cheap".
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