Poll

book says do not turn "engine over" ape says run in until it engages back off 1/4 turn. turn engine over?

a little detaled description may help!!!
2 (40%)
does this mean don't turn over until tensioner is engaged
3 (60%)

Total Members Voted: 5

Author Topic: ape timing chain tensioner install advice  (Read 6404 times)

Offline tracyscoleman

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ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« on: June 02, 2011, 06:22:11 pm »
does this mean dont turn engine over until tensioner is engaged

Offline tracyscoleman

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ape timing chain tensioner?advice on install please
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2011, 08:12:38 pm »
book says dont turn engine without tensioner in place how do i know when tensioner is in far enough

Offline Uglydog56

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2011, 10:40:17 pm »
run the adjuster in, don't run the engine.
Rick A. Cone
COG #9186
98 Connie, 76 CB400F

Offline T Cro ®

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2011, 10:42:23 am »
Remove old tensioner, install new tensioner turn adjuster in until you "just" feel it make contact or slight resistance and stop. Now start engine and let run until up to operating temp, with engine running at idle back out on tensioner until you hear the chain "just" start to rattle, now turn the adjuster back in until the rattle "just" stops and no more lock it down. If engine rattles a little when cold after adjusting but does not rattle when hot that is the sweet spot not too loose or too tight. Now resist the urge to fiddle with it for as long as you can.
Tony P. Crochet
(SOLD) 01 Concours Winner of COG Most Modified in 2010
Ask me about a set of Stick Coils & Harness or Precision Shift Linkage for your C10 Concours

Offline TjTexasJack

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner?advice on install please
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2011, 10:49:44 am »
Greetings Tracy.

http://www.600rr.net/vb/showthread.php?t=135386

Ride safe, Keep sharp.
Tj

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2011, 02:06:42 pm »
good luck with that "feel" thing....that is why I absolutly loath those tensioners, every one i have adjusted is a guess and hope thing, the "tactile" feedback is just not there....at least for me, and I have adjusted (or attempted to) a few of them.

30 YEARS OF KAW.....

Offline medicevans

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2011, 07:23:46 pm »
What would you rather have?

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2011, 01:35:40 pm »
What would you rather have?

it's always a heated discussion about the manual tensioners, but MY personal preference is for a Correctly operating pre 94 type, the one that has the rotational adjusting cam.

I've disassembled and repaired quite a few of those (that people removed and re-installed incorrectly, or forced in the wrong direction) They work fine for me, and can be "shocked" to occasionally offer quite chain function when they are "almost ready" to re-adjust them selves... I have seen a few non-functioning post 94 ( the wratchet/pawl type) ones with issues, some were worn, some had the pawl spring out of position, and I believe all of the no-functioning ones I messed with were actually made non-functional by attempts to remove/re-install them in a manner that caused the malfunction.

My most common opinion is that most people overtighten the manual ones from the start, and again every time they touch them. There is so little pressure needed on the slider that it can't easily be felt due to the stiction the o-ring and bolt used on the APE exhibits, to feel the fine contact point.
this is just my opinion tho....

30 YEARS OF KAW.....

Offline markk53

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Re: ape timing chain tensioner install advice
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2011, 11:02:27 am »
does this mean dont turn engine over until tensioner is engaged

It means they don't know how to write a good instruction.  Anyone who has picked up one of my Krieger Cam Chain Tensioner units would tell you that.  One rider commented that the instructions I send could be followed by anyone who knows which end of a screw driver to hold.

As for manual versus "automatic" the question is more if you want to have to mess with something that shouldn't need to be messed with - it's automatic, after all - and hope it continues to work as you ride the bike or if you want a solid unit with a fixed adjustment that you know is working.

My instructions tell you to turn the adjuster bolt in finger tight.  Since few people in the world can generate more than an inch/pound or two of tightness by finger tightening an 8mm bolt, it is highly unlikely that they will overtighten the adjuster.  The problem I see is when you get someone who seems to think it should be tighter, because finger tight doesn't seem tight enough - why do they think there is a locking nut on the part? 

It's all about doing a good job of writing work instructions, which I happened to do for a cutting tool company.  It's also about having the engineering knowledge to understand what is going on and how the parts need to work together when writing them along with a willingness to work with riders.  This I have done over the years, ranging from answering questions on-line and by phone.  The last four tensioners I've developed came by rider requests.  The Kawasaki KLX250, Honda Superhawk/Firestorm/CBR, Yamaha XS1100, and Yamah XS850.  I started in this whole thing because that one company didn't bother getting with me when I asked if they could simply put a longer bolt into their GPz550 tensioner body.    They didn't help, so I did it myself and made a few extra.  Demand grew.  As people learn more about the cam drive system and how all of it works, the manual tensioner becomes the obvious choice when the OEM fails. 

Of course I will say, "if it ain't broke don't fix it."  But when the part does fail, do what the racers do, get a simple part that will work reliably.  They don't want to break in the race andyou don't want to break hundreds of miles from home.  Same difference - both ruin your day.
[img]http://p1.bikepics.com/2010/03/27/bikepics-1936369-full.jpg[img]

KLX678, Zephyr, SR500 street/tracker (in progress) Bultaco Sherpa T